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LTU's annual Cisler Lecture to feature U-M president on advances in medicine

Release Date: March 6, 2017

Mark Schlissel, M.D., Ph.D.

 SOUTHFIELD, Mich. – Lawrence Technological University’s 2017 Walker L. Cisler Lecture will feature the president of the University of Michigan speaking on the remarkable advances of
modern medicine.

The lecture will be held Thursday, March 23 on the LTU campus, 21000 W. 10 Mile Road in Southfield.

UM President Mark Schlissel, M.D., Ph.D., will speak on “From the Discovery of DNA to the Modification of the Human Genome: How Basic Science Fuels Disease Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment.”

The lecture begins at 7 p.m. in the Mary E. Marburger Science and Engineering Auditorium, Room S100 of the LTU Science Building. A dessert reception will follow. The event is free and open to the public. For location and directions, visit www.ltu.edu/map.

The Walker L. Cisler Lecture Series was founded at Lawrence Tech with a generous gift from the Holley Foundation. Well known for his leadership of Detroit Edison from 1954 to 1971, Cisler enjoyed a career that spanned a lifetime of personal, professional, civic, and business accomplishments. As an international ambassador for the American utility industry, and a tireless humanitarian, he strived to improve the quality of life for people everywhere.

Schlissel became the 14th president of UM, and the first physician to take the position, in July 2014. He previously was provost of Brown University, where he was responsible for academic and budgetary functions, as well as libraries and research institutes.

A native of Brooklyn, N.Y, Schlissel earned a Bachelor of Arts in biochemical sciences from Princeton University in 1979, and M.D. and Ph.D. degrees in physiological chemistry from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1986. He did his residency in internal medicine at Hopkins Hospital and conducted postdoctoral research as a Bristol-Myers Cancer Research Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Schlissel joined the faculty of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1991, and earned several awards and fellowships for his research and teaching. He moved to the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California-Berkeley in 1999 as associate professor, advancing to full professor in 2002.

His research has focused on the developmental biology of B lymphocytes, the cell type in the immune system that secretes antibodies. His work has contributed to a detailed understanding of genetic factors involved in the production of antibodies and how mistakes in that process can lead to leukemia and lymphoma. He is the author or co-author of more than 100 scientific papers and trained 21 successful doctoral candidates. 

He was UC-Berkeley’s dean of biological sciences in the College of Letters & Science and held the C.H. Li Chair in Biochemistry until his appointment as Brown’s provost in 2011.